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Heineken Planned to Build Houses Out of Beer and More News

Heineken Planned to Build Houses Out of Beer and More News


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In today's Media Mix, who made the ice cream cone, plus a Brazilian restaurant awards women for confidence

The Daily Meal brings you the biggest news from the food world.

The Ice Cream Cone History: A brief history of the ice cream cone, and how the waffle cone has changed shape over the years. [NY Times]

Heineken's Beer Bottle House: Apparently, back in the 1960s, Heineken proposed a plan to create rectangular beer bottles that could be used as bricks for affordable housing. [Fast Co]

Chef's Table on Cruises? Princess Cruises are adding a "Chef's Table" option for hard-core food lovers who want to peek behind the scenes in the galley during dinner. [News OK]

Brazilian Restaurant Rewards Confidence: A genius marketing scheme from a Brazilian restaurant recorded female customers who were asked, "Are you beautiful?" If they answered yes, they were given a free meal. [BuzzFeed]


Tree House Brewing Company Julius

AHA member Marshall Bishop loves Tree House Julius so much that he has devoted untold hours to developing a faithful homebrew clone, the recipe for which he has kindly shared with us. Marshall offers helpful advice for brewing this recipe.

Water chemistry, a specific combination of yeasts, plus acids and essential oils from the hops combine to give this beer its hazy appearance. Tree House doesn’t use flaked grains.

Minimizing calcium in the brewing water contributes a soft mouthfeel. Hard water ions such as magnesium and calcium can contribute chalky, thick sensations – if you want softness in a beer, start with soft water. Using canning salt (sodium chloride) provides chloride without adding calcium.

The long whirlpool at 108°F (42°C) extracts and retains volatile hop flavor and aroma compounds that would otherwise evaporate at higher temperatures. You can replace the whirlpool with a hop stand to maximize contact between hops and wort, but you will get the best utilization from constantly stirring during whirlpool.

Dried yeast has sufficient sterols for healthy fermentation, so there’s no need to aerate or oxygenate. You want to stress the yeast enough to encourage ester production. Esters and other complex fruity, yeast-derived flavors match perfectly with the hop-derived fruity flavors and aromas. Resist the temptation to round up the specified quantities of WB-06 and T-58 if you can’t measure less than one gram, as these will dominate the clean strain and add too much farmhouse character.

Pitching warm and then cooling the fermentation encourages ester production while retaining volatile aromatic compounds. You still want some yeast activity when adding the dry hops, more to prevent oxidation than for any biotransformation mumbo jumbo.

Dry hopping in a mesh bag is not recommended. You’ll get better wort contact by letting the pellet hops dissolve and float free in the primary. Cold crashing won’t clear the beer of hop/polyphenol haze, but it will settle yeast.

Learn more about Marshall’s process at trinitybrewers.com.

Yield: 5.5 US gallons (20.8 L)

The following beer recipe is featured in the July/August 2019 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Access this issue along with the archives with Zymurgy Online!

AHA member Marshall Bishop loves Tree House Julius so much that he has devoted untold hours to developing a faithful homebrew clone, the recipe for which he has kindly shared with us. Marshall offers helpful advice for brewing this recipe.

Water chemistry, a specific combination of yeasts, plus acids and essential oils from the hops combine to give this beer its hazy appearance. Tree House doesn’t use flaked grains.

Minimizing calcium in the brewing water contributes a soft mouthfeel. Hard water ions such as magnesium and calcium can contribute chalky, thick sensations – if you want softness in a beer, start with soft water. Using canning salt (sodium chloride) provides chloride without adding calcium.

The long whirlpool at 108°F (42°C) extracts and retains volatile hop flavor and aroma compounds that would otherwise evaporate at higher temperatures. You can replace the whirlpool with a hop stand to maximize contact between hops and wort, but you will get the best utilization from constantly stirring during whirlpool.

Dried yeast has sufficient sterols for healthy fermentation, so there’s no need to aerate or oxygenate. You want to stress the yeast enough to encourage ester production. Esters and other complex fruity, yeast-derived flavors match perfectly with the hop-derived fruity flavors and aromas. Resist the temptation to round up the specified quantities of WB-06 and T-58 if you can’t measure less than one gram, as these will dominate the clean strain and add too much farmhouse character.

Pitching warm and then cooling the fermentation encourages ester production while retaining volatile aromatic compounds. You still want some yeast activity when adding the dry hops, more to prevent oxidation than for any biotransformation mumbo jumbo.

Dry hopping in a mesh bag is not recommended. You’ll get better wort contact by letting the pellet hops dissolve and float free in the primary. Cold crashing won’t clear the beer of hop/polyphenol haze, but it will settle yeast.


San Antonio's legacy as ice house capital of the world still growing

A former ice house and gas station space that dates back to the 1920s at 419 S. Hackberry St. has received special historic landmark designation and will be transformed into a coffee house that serves beer and wine.

A former ice house and gas station space that dates back to the 1920s at 419 S. Hackberry St. has received special historic landmark designation and will be transformed into a coffee house that serves beer and wine.

A former ice house and gas station space that dates back to the 1920s at 419 S. Hackberry St. has received special historic landmark designation and will be transformed into a coffee house that serves beer and wine.

San Antonio is an ice house kind of town. Originally places that sold ice, the businesses evolved into family-friendly spots &mdash equal parts convenience store and beer joint &mdash that dotted the city&rsquos landscape.

There were so many, a 1986 New York Times article dubbed San Antonio the &ldquoacknowledged world capital&rdquo of the ice house.

Although they never died out here, the numbers dwindled after the 1960s. But a new generation is bringing them back, and the latest is coming to the East Side to a a run-down 1927 building that has sat empty for 20 years.

In a year, the Denver Heights spot could be serving beer and wine by night and coffee by day.

Back when it was built, the building at 419 S. Hackberry St. housed Bull&rsquos Ice Station, an ice house that sold ice through at least 1976 with several ownership and name changes, at one point serving as an auto service station. There is still a stone pediment with the word &ldquoICE&rdquo on the upper facade of the structure.

According to Historic and Design Review Commission documents, from 1867, just after the Civil War, until the 1950s, San Antonio was considered a manufacturing leader in ice production. In 1867, three of the nation&rsquos five ice factories were located here, all for the love of beer.

San Antonio&rsquos new German population demanded German beer, and breweries answered the call with lots of lager, which requires a colder fermentation process, fueling the ice boom here.

Decades later, Bull&rsquos Ice Station, with it&rsquos Spanish accents and red barrel tile roof, was one of the businesses selling blocks of ice.

&ldquoThis was considered an essential part of this neighborhood back in the day, and we hope to bring it back in the name of preservation,&rdquo said the owner, developer Michael Perez. &ldquoI&rsquom not sure how many landmarks are in this Denver Heights neighborhood, but this one is special.&rdquo

The HDRC gave Perez and his wife Angela its approval during a Wednesday hearing to move forward with plans for their property. Plans for historical designation must also receive final approval from the zoning commission and the City Council.

The property is one of 34 former gas stations or ice houses throughout San Antonio that have been recognized by the HDRC as architecturally, culturally and historically significant. Perez and his wife hope to open their coffee shop/beer and wine bar next spring.

He said that the building still contains the old cooling system that was used to chill the ice blocks, and he thinks they can be restored to working condition. The structure was built with concrete and stucco and is structurally sound, but the rest of the 679-square-foot property will need to be renovated.


A road trip across the cornbelt of America finds a reader enjoying an unexpected surprise of a beer in Iowa. The Replicator tracks down the story behind the beer, the brewery, and a recipe.

Ask Mr. Wizard
Ask Mr. Wizard

When substituting bittering hops, how important are the hop characteristics? It would seem that the boiling of the hops destroys most everything except the desired bitterness. Also, the hop substitution guide lists Northern Brewer as a substitute for Perle but not the reverse. Can you clarify this for me?

Welcome to the Brew Your Own Community
Welcome to the Brew Your Own Community

Hi! I'm Brad, Publisher of Brew Your Own. Our mission is to deliver well-researched homebrewing information in a clear way to help people pursue their passion for making great beer at home. We try to be informative without being intimidating. This is, after all, a hobby not a job. So, we give you scientifically-sound information in an entertaining format that never loses sight of the how-to mission we have. We want to give you the skills to craft great beer at home. That's why we not only publish proven recipes, but we also write about common brewing problems (Ask Mr. Wizard) and provide you with information, tips, DIY projects, and techniques so you can make your own world-class beer. For over two decades Brew Your Own magazine has earned the respect of homebrewers worldwide with our mix of how-to content in the hobby's largest paid circulation publication. Digital members now have access to thousands of these tested and reviewed recipes, techniques, and projects and complete access to recent and current issues of Brew Your Own magazine as well as our Special Issue library. The majority of this updated homebrewing content is being released digitally here for the first time to our digital members. I don't think you'll find homebrewing content of this quality and authority anywhere else online. We'd love to have you join us as a member!

Cheers, Brad Ring

What Readers Say About Brew Your Own
What Readers Say About Brew Your Own

"You guys are great, thanks for being such a great representative and advocate for the homebrewing hobby! Keep up the good work of keeping great info available for homebrewers."

"Well done guys! Digital is the easy way to read you anywhere in the world."

"You make a great product and are by far the best source of information on the market."

"Great ideas, easy to read, and very informational. Love it!"


The tech start-up inside a beer giant

"The reason I came here was to move the company to the next level," said Michel Doukeris, who was named Anheuser-Busch's CEO in November 2017 after 21 years with the brewer, most previously as chief sales officer. "I'm trying to reframe the company."

Look no further than Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood, where Anheuser-Busch has built a "commercial strategy office," its label for the 12-story retrofit more suitable to a tech start-up than a 167-year-old brewmeister. Casually attired millennials and Gen Zers congregate in open spaces, brainstorming about things like Apollo 11, the consumer-centric, data-driven innovation program named, no doubt, to inspire moonshot ideas.

The CNBC Evolve Summit returns to LA on June 9, 2020. Registration for this event is now open.

One giant leap is an overhauled concept-to-shelf product-development process, which used to take almost two years but can now be executed in less than 100 days. For instance, its marketers are moving away from focus groups, replacing them with an online panel of more than 6,000 consumers who communicate daily with the company via social media.

"We have 40 people on the twelfth floor who are just coders," said Doukeris of the non-traditional workforce. He's sitting on a barstool in the ground-level microbrewery, called 24th Street Hops, where small batches of beers are whipped up for on-site taste-testing. The building also houses ZX Ventures, the company's four-year-old innovation and investment group, and Draftline, its in-house ad agency that supplements the creative work of more than 50 outside agencies of record. The unit showed off its nimbleness during this fall's World Series, cranking out an ad and PR blitz the day after a Washington Nationals fan "caught" a home run ball against his chest, saving the Bud Lights clutched in both hands.

Beer is still the most popular boozy beverage in the U.S., which is AB InBev's largest market, accounting for $15.5 billion of its $54.6 billion in global revenue last year. Sales by volume, however, have been steadily declining. In October the global company lowered profit growth forecasts for 2019 after reporting lackluster third-quarter performances in the U.S., China, Brazil and South Korea.

"We have a demographic situation that the beer industry has never had to deal with before," said Lester Jones, chief economist of the National Beer Wholesalers Association, which represents around 3,000 distributors that deliver products to liquor stores, restaurants, bars and other licensed retail outlets. As boomers and millennials mature, and Gen Z comes of drinking age, brewers face a daunting balancing act of retaining brand loyalists while simultaneously attracting new customers. "Unlike 25 years ago, when they didn't have to worry about this, today companies are walking a tight wire between keeping people engaged with innovation and with legacy brands," Jones said.

AB InBev's major U.S. competitors — Molson Coors, Constellation Brands, Heineken and Pabst Brewing — are in the same boat. They continue to aggressively promote and extend their respective legacy brands and appeal to non-beer drinkers.

Although those conglomerates dominate the beer marketplace, the actual number of brewers has exponentially grown in recent years, to nearly 7,500, most of them small, local craft beer makers that have significantly disrupted the industry. According to the Brewers Association in Boulder, Colorado, which represents small and independent craft beer makers, overall U.S. beer volume sales were down 1% in 2018, while craft sales continued to grow at a rate of 4% by volume, reaching 13.2% of the U.S. beer market by volume. Retail dollar sales of craft increased 7%, to $27.6 billion, and now account for more than 24% of the U.S. beer market.


Steeplejack Brewing drafts All-Star Team for upcoming Portland brewpub in restored church

An upcoming brewpub wants to deliver a religious experience to craft beer fans in northeast Portland’s Sullivan’s Gulch neighborhood. Steeplejack Brewing was teased as one of our most anticipated upcoming Oregon breweries of 2021 for the ambitious plan and beautiful renderings of a church turned into a different kind of public house. As the project comes closer to reality the doors to this 112 year old temple are opening up to reveal the good work of founders and longtime friends Brody Day and Dustin Harder and the team they are assembling to help lead it. When your brewery is in a church that was christened by a U.S. president, you’d almost expect the house of the lord to overshadow the front and back of the house staff. But with an all too rare female led brewing team and an experienced publican at the helm, the public will again be crowding into this community gathering space for some holy water.

Formerly The Metropolitan Community Church, members of the congregation sold the building at 2400 NE Broadway to Day and Harder in Spring of 2019 and the pair quickly began the large renovation project that will involve installing a brewhouse, cellar, television/game room, full liquor bar, live performance stage, and a daytime coffee lounge. Demolition and rebuilding is underway as crews are digging up a section of the main hall of worship for a sunken brewery, but SteepleJack plans to keep many of the most iconic and timeless elements of the building intact. William Howard Taft, the 27th president of the United States, actually laid the cornerstone of the church at a ceremony in front of thousands of onlookers back in the day. But the primary feature is the 65’ ft. high steeple and bell tower from which the brewery gets it’s name, and the location where eastbound traffic on Weidler merges onto NE 24th next to Broadway will likely restore the building to being just as much of a cant miss landmark as it was in the early 1900’s.

the former Metropolitan Community Church is undergoing renovations to become Steeplejack Brewing

Brody Day comes to the endeavour with with over 20 years of experience in homebrewing, and nearly that long as a BJCP judge. His career before this one has given him an extensive knowledge in food sourcing, supply chain management and business acumen. Meanwhile Harder brings a background in mechanical services and construction, his family business Harder Mechanical Contractors specializes in everything from aerospace to chemical manufacturing and food & beverage and has worked with breweries like Widmer Brothers.

“I've learned what it takes to make ok beer vs. truly outstanding beer with replicable results. The margin for error is very small, and every ingredient, temperature and process is critical. We are not setting out to make mediocre beer and it's my vision to help set the standard,” says Day.

Still with their wealth of knowledge, Day and Harder knew they had to bring in an outstanding team of brewing and restaurant/pub professionals. They landed on three familiar faces in the Oregon craft beer industry: Enter head brewer Anna Buxton formerly of Modern Times, lead brewer Anne Aviles formerly of Breakside Brewery, and general manager Billy Cook formerly of McMenamins Breweries.

Steeplejack Brewing crew (left to right) Anne Aviles, Anna Buxton, and Brody Day.

“I interviewed more than two dozen brewers from all over the US,” says Day. “Anna was the most prepared, most professional, and most experienced pub/startup brewer I met. All other interviews I conducted measured against her first impression. The same was true of Anne: I was immediately impressed with her recipe development, production facility and barrel experience. Steeplejack beer will be world-class through their collaboration and complementary skills.”

Anna Buxton will leave her current brewing position at Modern Times Beer’s Belmont Fermentorium to lead the Steeplejack Brewing team and Anne Aviles comes from an assistant production brewing role at Breakside Brewery.

ANNA BUXTON - Head Brewer

Anna Buxton has had an eclectic career in and out of the brewing industry. She studied and worked at the Chimpanzee Human Communications Institute in Ellensburg, WA while getting bachelor's degrees in both Chinese Language and Religious Studies/Philosophy from XiNan MinZu DaXue. She worked as a professional river guide and skier, before deciding to try something new and ended up a bartender at Badger Mountain Brewing in Wenatchee, WA. Through that work Buxton became enamored with craft beer and started homebrewing, she moved to Bozeman, MT and searched for a professional brewing gig but had no luck.

That’s when Buxton began eyeing Portland. After moving to town she was quickly hired by Todd Britt at Rock Bottom Brewery who became her first brewing industry mentor.

“It's from him that I gained my love of traditional english and scottish style pub beers as well as belgian and trappist style beers,” says Buxton of Britt (who is now at Victor 23 Brewing in Vancouver, WA.) At the same time Buxton picked up a job brewing at Uptown Market’s brewery (now called Binary Brewing) with Rob Howard who now brews at Stormbreaker Brewing. Together they learned the ins and outs of brewery management and recipe development. Her career took another detour when she accepted the head brewer job at Rock Bottom’s Long Beach, CA location before coming back to Portland and starting off as a cellarman at Modern Times.

“I was brand new to production brewing, but quickly worked my way into a Brewer II position. At Modern Times I learned not only how to make hype beer well, but also some of the finer nuances of traditional German Beer from Mat Sandoval. From Mat I also learned first hand what it takes to keep a brewery of that output running with such a small team. Conrad Andrus joined us later, and for that I will forever be grateful because its from Conrad that I refocused my time learning brewing science but also rediscovered some joy in the brewing process. They have both been incredibly helpful and supportive as I start on this new venture.”

ANNE AVILES - Lead Brewer

Anne Aviles is an east coast native who graduated from a tiny liberal arts college in Maine but moved to Oregon not knowing what she really wanted to do with her degree. When she got to Portland the goal was to find a career revolving around teaching and science, but she quickly fell into the craft beer scene. It wasn’t long before Aviles found herself working at Belmont Station bottle shop and biercafe and that’s where she had her “a-ha!” moment realizing that craft beer and brewing could become her career.

“I always had an interest in beer and fermentation and did some homebrewing here and there but was always frustrated that my attempts didn't match my ambitious hopes of brewing the perfect beer. Really all it took for me to make better beer was to drink more of it,” says Aviles, who then moved into more fermentation based work at a vineyard and then at De Garde Brewing in Tillamook before landing at Breakside Brewery.

“While I was at De Garde a lot of what I learned was a lot closer to wine making than a brewing job. I joke that instead of putting in my time keg washing, I put in my time cleaning oak puncheons." Then when she transferred over to Breakside, Aviles began work as a production brewer in another very different type of brewing environment. Working under brewmaster Ben Edmunds and the prestigious award-winning production team brought an attention details that make a good beer great.

“While I had the opportunity to build a couple of recipes there (Breakside), I was always itching for that 100% creative freedom. I'm looking forward to putting myself out there where the product of my creativity is a means for gathering and taking time to slow down for a moment,” says Aviles. “the transition over to Steeplejack is what I've been building up to since I've acquired the tools I needed to be the skilled creative brewer I've always wanted to be. I'm seeing this as an opportunity to take what I've learned from my unique brewing experiences to make the beer that I've always wanted to make….Fast forward to today, after drinking countless pints for "research" and working two brewing jobs I'd like to say I'm a little bit closer to that goal of brewing the perfect beer.”

the main hall at Steeplejack, the brewhouse and production will sit against the back wall beneath the stained glass


How to Make Beer

As I mentioned earlier, I planned to make a porter. I found an interesting recipe on the internet:

6 pounds plain amber malt extract
8 ounces crushed crystal malt (60 L)
4 ounces crushed chocolate malt
4 ounces crushed black patent malt
1 ounce cluster hops (bittering)
1/2 ounce Williamette hops (finishing)

Along with these ingredients, there are a few standard items you’ll need for any beer making journey: a grain steeping bag (essentially a teabag for steeping the grains in the water), priming sugar, yeast, and caps.

All of these items are available at a beermaking supply store. I acquired all of the above for roughly $35.

A big part of the fun of homebrewing is that you can experiment with the recipes as much as you want. For example, my wife and I made an oatmeal stout that went off the recipe quite a bit and it turned out sublimely delicious.

Boil the Water and Steep

Most beer making recipes follow a pretty standard procedure. Just pour two gallons of water into your large pot, heat it to 160 degrees F (80 degrees C) or so, put the grains in the grain bag and tie it off, then drop the grain bag in the water to steep for twenty minutes or so.

Above, I took the picture just after dropping the “tea bag” into the water. The steeping will cause the water to change color, usually to some shade of brown. Here’s what it looks like after the steeping.

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Adding Malt

Once the steeping is finished, you simply bring the pot up to a low boil and add the malt extract (a brown liquid) and the bittering hops. Leave this at a low boil for an hour (stirring it regularly), then five minutes before the end, drop the finishing hops into the mix. Once it’s finished boiling (it’s now called “wort”), you’ll need to cool it down to 70 degrees – I usually do this by dunking the stock pot into ice water in the sink. I then pour this into the carboy, though you can also do it in the bucket if you don’t have a carboy, then I add two to three gallons of filtered water. I then drop in the yeast, stir it a bit, then put the bubbler on top and let it ferment. Here’s a picture of my porter in the carboy at the start of fermentation.

Wait Two Weeks!

Then you wait. Usually, you’ll wait for roughly two weeks. What you’re looking for is whether or not there are bubbles coming through the bubbler. Watch it for a minute – if you see no bubbles, wait another three days and you’re ready to finish it up.

Finishing

When you’re ready to finish it, you simply add the priming sugar to two cups of boiling water, boil the priming sugar/water solution for a few minutes, then add that to the beer. You can then bottle it – if you’re not going to bottle it, you should serve it in the next couple of days.

Bottling

Bottling is similarly easy. You just thoroughly clean 50 to 60 beer bottles, fill each one carefully, then put a cap on each one with the capping tool (basically, you just put a small disc on top of the bottle, put the capping tool on top, and squeeze). Let the bottles sit for a few weeks and then it’s ready to drink.


Top 10 Largest Beer Companies and Beer Brands in the World 2020:

1) Anheuser-Busch InBev

Despite the predictions about the global and American beer market continuing to lose ground to spirits, wine and marijuana, the bigger beer manufacturers have surprisingly reported strong growth and earnings in 2018. Anheuser-Busch InBev, based in Belgium, has surpassed growth expectations compared to its competitors and consequently sits atop the global beer market, making it one of the largest beer companies in the world.

Although sales of its flagship beer brands Bud Light and Budweiser continue to drop, AB InBev’s acquisition of SABMiller recently combined with earlier rights to Corona and Stella Artois has boosted its value globally. The brewer distributes its product portfolio of 500 beer brands through a massive network of over 600 independent company-owned distributors and wholesalers nationwide.

2) Heineken

Dutch-based beer brand Heineken has been a global brewing leader for the last 150 years. Today, as the No. 2 brewer in the world and No. 1 in Europe, the company is ramping up production via the use of advanced and breakthrough technologies such as big data and artificial intelligence (AI). Heineken sells more than 8.5 million barrels of its beer brands in the U.S and expects those numbers to increase with data-driven developments and AI augmentation to its operations, advertising, and customer experience.

Founded in 1864, the company owns over 160 breweries in more than 70 countries as. Heineken produces regional, local, international and specialty beers and ciders. The company’s international beer brands include Amstel, Desperados, Sol, Affligem, Tiger, Tecate, Red Stripe and Krušovice.

Download related market report sample: Beer Market in Europe

3) China Resources Snow Breweries

Headquartered in Hong Kong, China Resources’ beer business is well known for its “Snow” beverage, accounting for about 20% of the Chinese beer market. One of its flagship beer brands, Snow is now one of the top-selling beer brands in the world. Although a lead in the domestic beer market, China Resources’ beer portfolio is little known elsewhere. As of 2017, it operates 98 breweries in 25 provinces, administered municipalities, and autonomous regions in Mainland China with an annual production capacity of more than 20 million kiloliters.

China Resources Snow Breweries was a joint venture between SABMiller and China Resources Enterprise. However, after the former’s acquisition by Anheuser Busch InBev, China Resources bought out the remaining stake.

For more details about the global beer market size, top beer companies and future trends of this market, take a look at Technavio’s Global Beer Market Report 2018-2022, or download your Free Sample Report Now.

4) Carlsberg

Founded in 1847 by J.C. Jacobsen, Carlsberg is one of the leading international brewery groups in the world today, with a vast portfolio of beer and other beverage brands. Since the 1990s, Carlsberg has been achieving steady but modest growth in sales and profits, despite an intensely competitive beer market. In March 2016, the Carlsberg Group introduced its new strategy, SAIL󈧚, to set a new direction for the Group with a significant focus on its core beer business and distinct areas for future progress.

Once a big beer brand with a small corporate footprint, Carlsberg Group has become the world’s fourth-largest beer company within the past two decades, acquiring other small beer brands such as Kronenbourg. The company now operates 140 beer brands worldwide.

5) Molson Coors Brewing

Incorporated in 2003, Molson Coors is a leading global brewer with 31 breweries, selling its diverse portfolio of over 90 strategic and partner brands in more than 50 countries. The company has a strong presence and brand momentum in three of the world’s largest markets. It is the second-largest beer company in the US by way of MillerCoors and SABMiller, a leading brewer in Canada via Molson Coors Canada, and a top-tier brewer in the UK and Central Europe through Molson Coors Europe.

Long-time adversaries, US-based Molson Coors and UK-based SABMiller put aside their differences to merge their operations in the US and Puerto Rico in a joint venture, MillerCoors. MCBC continues to follow a growth strategy that includes building a stronger brand portfolio, growing the market share among its core brands, delivering value-added innovation, and growing its business in the premium, craft, and cider markets.

6) Tsingtao Brewery Group

Tsingtao Beer, one of China’s oldest beer companies, is gaining immense popularity around the world and has been successful in establishing a high-end Chinese beer brand image worldwide. With a history 115 years long, the Qingdao-based brewer has been selling its products in more than 100 countries. Its Western Europe sales grew 8% last year, while sales in the overseas market increased by 12%. As per the Centre of International Communication Studies, Tsingtao has acquired over 90% brand recognition in several developed countries in Europe and North America.

This beer brand is developing more and more customized products to meet the growing demands of different customers, including beverages brewed with dates and peaches. Tsingtao is looking forward to experimenting with new tastes and varieties through co-operation with its European partners. Tsingtao adheres to a “high-quality, high-visibility and high-price” strategy.

7) Asahi

Founded in 1889 in Osaka as the Osaka Beer Company, Asahi Breweries kept the No. 1 position in sales volume in Japan for twelve straight years after it launched Asahi Super Dry, Japan’s first dry draft beer. The company, celebrating its 128th anniversary, produces a wide variety of beer products and other alcoholic beverages to meet the varied needs of its customers. The Asahi Breweries Group is expanding its business to products beyond just alcohol, including foods and pharmaceuticals.

Asahi Breweries is reaping the benefits after strengthening its foothold in the European marketplace. It did this by acquiring beer brands that raised its status to one of the five biggest brewers in Asia. As demand for beer products wane at home and local competition with rivals like Kirin Holdings Co. intensifies, Asahi is stepping up to expand overseas.

8) Yanjing

Beijing Yanjing Beer Group, a China-based beer company, started off as Yanjing Brewery before consolidating into a group of companies that is categorized by the state, and is known for its top-quality beer products. Beijing Yanjing Beer is currently the country’s fourth most popular beer brand, and one of the world’s largest beer companies.

The company distributes its vast product portfolio, which includes beer, distilled wine, feed, materials, yeast, plastic boxes, and mineral water under the brands Liquan, Huiguan, Yanjing, and Xuelu. Yanjing mainly targets the domestic market, particularly South China and North China.

9) Kirin

Japan-based Kirin is one of the largest producers of beverages, and its subsidiary Kirin Brewery Company is one of the largest beer brands in the world. The company holds a stake in Myanmar Brewery Limited as well as Asia Pacific Breweries and owns Kirin Europe, Kirin Brewery of America, Philippine-based San Miguel Brewery, and other subsidiaries. In Japan, the company’s Ichiban Shibori and Kirin Lager are well-known beer brands, while its Kirin Tanrei is a popular low-malt beer.

Download related market report sample: Global Craft Beer Market 2020-2024

10) Groupe Castel

The Castel Group was founded in 1949. For over six decades, the company has devoted its skills and energy to spreading the word about French wines globally, and developing its soft drink and beer sectors in Africa. Castel is a globally recognized beverage name and one of the world’s largest beer companies, symbolized by a wide range of acclaimed Châteaux and brands, and with an established presence in over 130 countries.

The majority of Groupe Castel beer products are produced in Africa, where it expanded in 1990 with the purchase of Brasseries et Glacières Internationales (BGI). Flag and Castel are its most popular and enduring beer brands.

View more information about the top beer companies in the world, please download your Global Beer Market Report Sample for FREE!

Technavio’s beer market research is part of our alcoholic beverages report portfolio:


This Thai Temple Was Built Using 1.5 Million Beer Bottles

Glittering like an giant emerald in a tranquil pond is Thailand’s most eco-friendly temple. Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew (Wilderness Temple of the Great Glass Pagoda), also known as the Temple of a Million Bottles, is a testament to a community coming together to reduce pollution. In 1984, Buddhist monks in Sisaket province in northeastern Thailand grew tired of the mounting litter in the countryside and began a “100 Beer Bottles on the Wall” challenge. Headmaster Phra Khru Vivek Dharmajahn led the movement to build a temple decorated with glass containers on a deserted burial ground in the local village. The monks encouraged residents and businesses to donate their used beverage containers. Soon, the challenge attracted more empty bottles, which were reincarnated to build the glass temple in a span of two years.

A closer look at the bottles that go into making Thailand's ingenious Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew temple.

Photo: Crystite licenced / Alamy Stock Photo

In a spellbinding pattern of contrasting repetition, green Heineken and brown domestic Chang and Singha beer bottles are aligned into the concrete walls and spired roof of the structure. The colorful bottles also adorn the railings of the walkways leading to the temple grounds. Small brown Red Bull bottles (an energy drink that was inspired by an existing drink in Thailand) are used in a cross-hatching style on certain parts of the building, with green bottles mixed in at the top for contrast. Even the floors have the bottoms of bottles bored into them, creating an artistic mosaic that’s smooth to bare feet. This unique construction saved the monks money that would have otherwise been spent on paint and tiles, and helped clean up the province in the process.

The Temple of a Million Bottles is also the most eco-friendly temple in a country that houses over 40,000 temples.

Photo: Crystite licenced / Alamy Stock Photo

The pagoda (a tiered tower), ablaze with color from light reflecting through the 1.5 million bottles, acts as a stunning reminder of not just the scope of pollution, but the appeal of recycling. Inside, letting nothing go to waste, bottle caps, some still showing their logos, were used to create Buddhist art. It’s hard to take your eyes off the mural of Buddha meditating under the Bodhi tree, painstakingly made with bottle caps. As the monks collected more, they expanded the concept to approximately 20 buildings, including prayer rooms, a water tower, monk abodes, the crematorium, and tourist bathrooms.

A view of Buddha, surrounded by colorful beer bottles.

Photo: Courtesy of the TAT (Tourism Authority of Thailand)

Being mindful is one of the key tenets of Buddhism, and a visit to this unconventional shrine makes one reflect upon the impact a handful of people can have in a community. The resourceful monks have no plans to stop anytime soon the more bottles collected, the more structures they plan to build.


Cinco Ranch nears build-out with pricey houses on big lots

2 of 2 Partners in Building is building homes on 90-foot wide lots in the Estates at Ridgefield Heights in Cinco Ranch. Prices in the gated enclave range from $660,000s to over $1 million. Partners in Building Show More Show Less

Many of the final homes in Cinco Ranch are going up in the Estates at Ridgefield Heights, a gated enclave with 40 oversized lots in the Katy area.

After 25 years and nearly 15,000 homes, the Newland Communities development is almost sold out, with slightly more than 200 homes to go.

Partners in Building and Toll Brothers are building houses priced from $670,000 to more than $1 million on 90-foot-wide lots. The neighborhood is off Cinco Trace Drive near FM 1463 near Katy Independent School District's new MayDell Jenks Elementary.

Along with the nearly complete Ironwood Estates, Toll Brothers has 18 houses left to sell. The homes contain upward of 4,000 square feet and often five bedrooms.

While the economic downturn has slowed Toll Brothers' building by 20 percent since 2014, strength in the health care industry is diversifying the pool of Cinco Ranch buyers. The 8,100-acre community has long been a popular choice among employees of the Energy Corridor on Houston's west side.

"We're still seeing some strength in the very high price points, $800,000 to $1 million," said David Assid, Houston division president of Pennsylvania-based Toll Brothers.

Cinco Ranch Estates at Ridgefield Heights

Prices: $670,000 to more than $1 million

Builders: Partners in Building, Toll Brothers

"That's part of our success we've had, not only in Cinco Ranch, but the Fox Bend section of Sienna Plantation."

Buyers like the cachet of a gated community with access to parks, recreational facilities, shopping and other amenities, Assid said. The houses have media rooms, game rooms, master bathrooms with double showers as options, and such hard-surface flooring as ceramic tile, marble or wood. High-end kitchen cabinets with wood-encased vent hoods and commercial-grade appliances are popular, as are outdoor entertaining areas.

"According to my sales team, you do get to a price point where people are very well capitalized, and changes in the economy don't impact them as much," Assid said.

"They're going to purchase what they want and they're willing to pay for it."

More than a quarter of the houses planned in Estates at Ridgefield Heights have sold so far.

Cinco Ranch had been a staple of national top-selling communities lists until recently. Builders started 195 houses last year, down from 414 in 2014 and 819 in 2013, according to housing consulting firm Metrostudy.


Watch the video: The Bottle House