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Poblano Albóndigas with Ancho Chile Soup

Poblano Albóndigas with Ancho Chile Soup


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6 first-course or 4 main-course Servings

Albóndigas is Spanish for meatballs. Ours are lightened with grated zucchini for this chile soup recipe.

Ingredients

Meatballs

  • 2 large fresh poblano chiles (9–10 ounces total)
  • 1 pound ground beef (15% fat)
  • ½ cup coarsely grated zucchini
  • ¼ cup finely grated onion
  • ¼ cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
  • 1 large egg, beaten to blend
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano (preferably Mexican), crumbled
  • ½ teaspoon coarse kosher salt

Soup

  • ½ small onion, coarsely grated
  • 3 tablespoons pure ancho chile powder or pasilla chile powder* (do not use blended chile powder)
  • 9 cups low-salt beef broth
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano (preferably Mexican)
  • 1 cup coarsely grated zucchini
  • ¼ cup long-grain white rice
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon (or more) fresh lime juice

Toppings

  • 3 tablespoons (or more) vegetable oil
  • 4 corn tortillas, cut into ¼-inch-wide strips

Recipe Preparation

Meatballs

  • Line large rimmed baking sheet with plastic wrap. Char chiles over direct flame or in broiler until blackened on all sides. Enclose in paper bag and steam 10 minutes. Stem, seed, and peel chiles, then chop finely (should yield about ¾ cup).

  • Place chiles in large bowl. Gently mix in beef and all remaining ingredients. Using moistened hands and scant tablespoonful for each, roll meat mixture into 1-inch meatballs. Arrange meatballs on sheet.

Soup

  • Heat oil in large pot over medium heat. Add onion with any juices and garlic. Sauté until onion is tender, about 3 minutes. Add chile powder and cumin; stir 1 minute. Add broth and oregano; bring to rolling boil. Reduce heat to very low, just below bare simmer, and cook 10 minutes.

  • Stir zucchini and rice into broth. Increase heat to medium and drop in meatballs, 1 at a time. Return soup to simmer. Cover and cook gently until meatballs and rice are cooked through, stirring occasionally and adjusting heat to avoid boiling, about 20 minutes. Add ¼ cup cilantro and 1 tablespoon lime juice. Season soup with salt and add more lime juice by teaspoonfuls, if desired.

Toppings

  • Heat 3 tablespoons oil in heavy medium skillet over medium heat 1 minute. Add half of tortilla strips. Cook until crisp, gently separating strips with tongs, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer strips to paper towels to drain. Repeat with remaining tortilla strips, adding more oil if needed.

  • Ladle soup and meatballs into bowls. Top with tortilla strips and cilantro.

Recipe by Jeanne Thiel Kelley,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains the following: Calories (kcal) 319.8 %Calories from Fat 37.1 Fat (g) 13.2 Saturated Fat (g) 4.4 Cholesterol (mg) 89.1 Carbohydrates (g) 26.4 Dietary Fiber (g) 2.5 Total Sugars (g) 5.1 Net Carbs (g) 23.9 Protein (g) 23.0Reviews SectionYou mention “add ancho Chile powder and cumin” but no quantity of cumin in the soup ingredients. Made meatballs but because your editor didn’t check the ingredients I am stuck with meatballs with no soup. Nice!AnonymousOttawa Canada05/16/20

What to Serve With Meatballs: Thinking Beyond Spaghetti With 10 Recipes

Everyone&aposs got an opinion on what to serve with meatballs, and it usually amounts to a plate of pasta and tomato sauce—and as delicious as spaghetti is, you&aposre really limiting yourself if that&aposs the only way you eat them! Meatballs are like the gifts that keep on giving, because they freeze really well after they&aposve been cooked, so you can reheat and add to any sauce or dish. Baked, fried, or skewered, here are ten exciting ways to serve up spaghetti&aposs favorite sidekick for dinner this week. Keep reading to find out what to eat with meatballs instead of pasta!


Caldo de Albondigas

This recipe I hold near and dear to my heart because it is my favorite of all of the recipes I learned from my Mom. Of course, her recipe was more simple — without all the extra added chiles! But I am a chile-head and just love to add it to my favorite recipes. I also added zucchini to the soup to make it a bi t heartier.

The basic flavors are all there and it takes me right back to being a kid. The nice thing about this recipe is that it can be made with any ground meat of your choice. It reminds me of chili because it tastes even better the next day! Unlike others, I can’t wait for cooler weather to enjoy my favorite soups recipes. Anytime is a good time for caldo de albondigas! Today I share with you a few of my favorite Caldo de Albondiga soup recipes.

Use the recipes as a guideline. I tend to like more spices in my recipes than my Mom ever used, but that is the fun part of the cooking process. Make a recipe your own, make memories with your friends and family. Enjoy the process. And most importantly, enjoy home cooked meals! Priceless! Every time I post about albondiga soup people ask me about the mint. Many traditional albondiga soup recipes call for adding yerba buena(mint) to the meatballs and a little to the soup base. I honestly do not remember my Mom adding mint, but I certainly am willing to give it a try! I am actually preparing some this week with the mint. I will update with pictures! See Video at the end of blog post!!

Kicked Up Albondiga Soup with Chipotle

This version of Caldo de Albondigas is nothing like my Mom’s original recipe. Just stating right now. It’s delicious and has a little bite from the chipotle. Besides the salt and pepper, all the spices added ar optional, lol!

Yields 6-8 Servings

Ingredients

For Meatballs
1 pound ground chuck
1/2 cup long grain rice, uncooked (I like to use jasmine rice)
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 chipotle, minced
1 egg

For Soup
2 roma tomatoes, diced or blended if you prefer
1 small poblano diced
1 medium zucchini, diced(about 3 cups)
1 small white onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 serrano pepper, minced
1/3 cup cilantro, chopped and more for garnish
Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon cumin seeds, crushed
1 teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed
1/2 teaspoon oregano
salt and pepper to taste
8 cups low sodium chicken broth

1. Combine all of the ingredients for the meatballs, stir well to combine, cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

2. In a dutch oven pot, heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil to medium heat. Add the onions, poblano, and serrano pepper, season lightly with salt and pepper, cook for 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the tomatoes, cilantro, lime juice, and chicken broth. Bring up to a boil.

3. While the soup comes to a boil, crush the oregano, cumin seeds and coriander seeds with a mortar and pestle, add to soup, stir well. Remove the meatball mix from refrigerator and make 30 small meatball while the soup comes to a boil. When soup is boiling, reduce heat just slightly and carefully drop in the meatballs. Gently stir, reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 30 to 35 minutes.

4. Add the zucchini the last 10 to 15 minutes of cooking time. Taste for salt. Garnish soup with lime wedges, green onions and more fresh cilantro. Serve with warm corn tortillas.


Featuring chipotle peppers, Tinga de pollo is a chicken flavorful stew. Though there is a stovetop option, this recipe uses the slow cooker. Before adding them to the pot, the pepper’s smokiness is enhanced by browning the chicken and charring the tomatoes. Sliced onion, chopped garlic, and bay leaves are often added.

As a rather light, yet filling soup, tender chunks of chicken combine with the creamy texture of avocado. The broth is flavored with onions, cilantro, and garlic. You can add a variety of common soup vegetables like peas or carrots to give the soup more depth of flavor. Thinly sliced jalapenos or sprinkle in the juice from a wedge of lime can add some zing.


Want to make this in the crock pot? Just add all your ingredients (except for your cilantro) to your slow cooker and cook on LOW for 4 hours. Add cilantro at the very end and salt and pepper if needed.

How to store + freeze albondigas? Let cool and store in an air-tight container in the fridge for 3-4 days or freeze in containers or doubled bagged in freezer bags. To reheat, let thaw in fridge over night and return to the stove and cook until heated through. You can also microwave it as well.

Here are some recipes we love to have with albondigas:

The smell of this Mexican Albondigas soup is soooo yummy and it will fill your entire house. Your family will be begging for second and third helpings! Let us know if you try Grandma’s recipe, and we hope you love it as much as we do.


Albóndigas, Mexican meatballs with tomato and chipotle broth

Mexico has its own version of meatballs, called Albóndigas. Often made with a mixture of pork and beef and served in a tomato broth, this is down-home Mexican cooking. My version contains no pork, but rather range-fed beef. The usual accompaniments are steaming corn tortillas, chopped onion, cilantro and avocado. Russ, my astute taster, looked for a dish of rice when we sat down for dinner. A bed of rice would be fine with this, and I’ll make some for him when we have left-overs tomorrow, but here in Mexico tortillas supply the carbs for albóndigas.

If you aren’t used to taking the time to form meatballs — and I’ll admit I don’t do this too often — put on some music to help pass the time while you form those little balls. Our FM station from Guadalajara, 91.9, plays hours of jazz and classical music without commercials. On Saturday afternoon, they feature Cuban son, a style of music with Cuban and African influence, popularized by The Buena Vista Social Club. I had those albóndigas rolled in no time while my feet kept time to the Afro-Caribbean beat.

My pride and joy, homemade beef stock, is in this dish. Stock this good can not be had for love or money — you have to make it yourself. If you love to cook, if you love great food, do yourself a favor and learn to make this simple, liquid gold.

Another essential ingredient, and one my kitchen is never without, is chipotle en adobo, canned, smoke-dried jalapeños. Muy picante, they are wonderful added to any soup, but be sure to mince very finely.

This recipe is adapted from The Cuisines of Mexico by Diana Kennedy. A transplanted Brit, Mrs. Kennedy was awarded the Order of the Aztec Eagle by the Mexican government for her writings on regional Mexican cuisine. Without her books, our tables would be less interesting and lack a certain alegría de vida.

Abóndigas in Tomato and Chipotle Broth

  • 3/4 lbs. (340 grams) ground range-fed beef
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 small (6 oz./170 grams) finely chopped calabacitas or zucchini
  • 1/2 teaspoon each dried Mexican oregano and mint, or 4 fresh leaves Mexican oregano and mint, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon comino (cumin) seeds
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • 1 lb. (1/2 kilo) fresh tomatoes (cooked in boiling water for 5 minutes and then peeled) or 1 3/4 cups (420 ml.) canned tomatoes
  • 2 chipotle chiles, finely minced
  • 2 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 1/2 onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3-4 cups light beef broth, preferably homemade
  • salt to taste
  • chopped cilantro, diced onion and cubed avocado for garnish
  • Cooked rice
  • warm corn tortillas
  1. With your hands, blend meat with next six ingredients. Form into 1 1/2″ (3.5-4 cm.) balls.
  2. Zizz tomatoes and chipotle chile in a blender, but don’t puree. Tiny pieces are interesting.
  3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-low flame, and cook onion for 4 minutes until translucent.
  4. Add garlic and cook 1 minute more.
  5. Add tomato and broth and bring to a simmer. Gently add meatballs and simmer covered for 45 minutes. Adjust salt.
  6. Serve in bowls with a generous amount of broth, garnishing with cilantro, onion and avocado, and tortillas on the side. Pass a bowl of cooked rice.

Etymology: Albóndiga is from the Arabic word, “al-bunduq”, meaning small hazelnut, i.e., a small round object. Albóndigas were brought to Spain by the Moors during Muslim rule. The dish continued to travel, arriving in Mexico with the Spaniards.

Like so many dishes blending onion, garlic and tomatoes, albóndigas are better the next day. They freeze well.

Traditional Mexican cooks don’t use canned tomatoes, and all the recipes for albóndigas call for fresh tomatoes, but it has become impossible to find really ripe tomatoes in Mexican stores. They are as unripe and pallid as tomatoes north of the border. Tomatoes in Mexico are now farmed on a large scale, with shipping and storage being a priority, not taste. If you can’t find red, ripe tomatoes, canned tomatoes offer reliable flavor.

Mexican oregano (Lippia berlandieri) and Mediterranean oregano (Origanum vulgare) are two different herbs. The former is the one commonly used in Mexican cuisine, while the latter is called for in Italian and Greek recipes.

Don’t forget to disinfect your veggies, especially cilantro, a close-to-the-ground plant, and therefore exposed to more contaminants.


Recipes Ideas

Acarajé: An Afro-Brazilian artery aliment fabricated with black-eyed peas and broiled shrimp.

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Achiote: Brick-red seeds with a agilely acidic, bawdy flavor. They’re generally acclimated as accustomed appearance to accord a bare cast to foods such as adulate and cheese.

Adobo: Marinade. Dry adobos are aroma rubs for meat, angle or poultry.

Ajiaco: A South American craven and basis vegetable soup.

Aji: Additionally accepted as the Peruvian hot pepper, this is a altered breed of chile, absolute several altered breeds. Frequently arena into powders, they appear in altered colors and accept a distinctive, fruity flavor. Aji is additionally a appellation for a South American salsa that’s served with stews and soups.

Arepas: A corn-based aliment from the arctic Andes in South America.Arroz con Gandules: A blithe Puerto Rican rice bowl fabricated with pigeon peas.

Arroz con Leche: A Latin American candied rice pudding sometimes fabricated with aperitive abridged milk or attic milk.

Arroz con Pollo: Translated as “rice with chicken” in Spanish, this acceptable bowl is accepted throughout Latin America.

Avocado: Botanically a fruit, the avocado is usually advised as a vegetable. Avocados accept been broadly acclimated in Latin America aback the time of the Aztecs, Mayas and Incas.

Bacalao: Broiled alkali cod that is accepted throughout Latin America.

Bacon: Any assertive cut of meat taken from the sides, abdomen or aback of a pig that may be convalescent and/or smoked.

Batidos: Milkshake or smoothie usually fabricated with beginning fruit.

Bell Peppers: Large, bell-shaped fruits that appear in altered colors, such as yellow, red, blooming and orange, and abridgement the calefaction of abounding added varieties of chiles.

Boniato: Bake-apple additionally accepted as white candied potato, Florida yam and camote. It looks like a candied potato, but is beneath and bastard with a white, hardly candied and abject flesh.

Buñuelos: Doughnut-like fritters flavored with a abstract or honey and generally anise and cinnamon.

Caipirinha: Brazilian cocktail fabricated with Cachaca (brandy fabricated from sugarcane), amoroso and adhesive juice.

Calabaza: A large, round, candied squash. Generally alleged a West Indian attic because it resembles a attic in admeasurement and coloring.

Canela: Cinnamon.Carnitas: Broiled pork served with blah tortillas and salsa. Translated, it agency “little meats.”

Cazuela: A affable meat bouillon begin in Chile and added South American countries.

Ceviche: Raw angle or seafood pickled and “cooked” in the acerb abstract of citrus fruit. Ceviches are generally flavored with herbs, chiles and added ingredients.

Champurrado: A warm, thick, chocolate-based Mexican drink.

Chicharron: Puffy absurd pork case eaten as a snack.

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Chicharron de Pollo: Absurd chicken, accepted in the Dominican Republic.

Chimichurri: Pesto-like additive from Argentina that’s fabricated with a abject of parsley, garlic and olive oil and generally acclimated with broiled meat.

Chipotle Pepper: Smoked jalapeno chile. Available canned, in a booze and dried.

Churros: A Latin American dessert, agnate to a donut or cruller.

Chocolate: Processed foods that are produced from the seeds of the cacao tree. Built-in to lowland, abutting South America, cacao has been able for 3,000 years in Central America and Mexico.

Chorizo: Spicy pork sausage. Mexican chorizo uses beginning pork Spanish chorizo uses smoked pork.

Chupes de Corvina y Camarones: A striped bass and shrimp stew.

Cilantro: Additionally alleged coriander, this abounding assemble is capital to Latin American cooking, decidedly Mexican, Andean and Brazilian.

Cinnamon: Mexican cinnamon. Additionally accepted as Ceylon biscuit for the island area it originated.

Coconut: A bake-apple that accustomed in Bahia, Brazil in 1553 and from there, advance throughout South America. Latin American cuisine uses both its milk and meat.

Cotijo: A Mexican cheese additionally accepted as Queso Anejado or “aged cheese.” Sold in baby circuit or ample blocks, this salty, acid cheese can be clammy with a arrangement like Feta or actual abutting for grating. Criumbled cheese can be acclimated in tacos, soups, salads or over beans.

Cumin (Comino): This acerb aromatic, characteristic aroma is acclimated in the foods of North Africa, Mexico, India and western Asia.

Dulce de Leche: Refers to both a booze and caramel-like candy.

Empanadas: A stuffed, agreeable pastry of Spanish origins.

Feijoa: A subtropical bake-apple built-in to the grasslands of southern Brazil and allotment of Paraguay and Uruguay. A abutting about of the guava, it has an egg-shaped shape, attenuate blooming bark and semi-soft, juicy, cream-colored beef with a sweet, ambrosial flavor.

Flan: A custard ambrosia coated with caramel, agnate to crème caramel.

Frijoles: Appellation for beans, about acclimated in Mexico.

Guava: Subtropical bake-apple with blooming bark and sweet, blush beef that is accepted throughout Latin America.

Jalepeño: A medium-hot to very-hot chile that is accepted in Mexican cooking.

Jicama: Additionally accepted as the Mexican potato or Mexican turnip, this ample brittle basis vegetable is acceptable both raw and agilely cooked.

Locro: A hearty, blubbery bouillon that consistently contains corn.

Mango: This bake-apple has fragrant, juicy, candied beef back absolutely ripe. Built-in to Asia, it is accepted in Latin American cooking.

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Maracuyá: Additionally alleged affection fruit. A round, lime-sized bake-apple with ablaze orange, awful ambrosial and bracingly acerb flesh.

Masa Harina: Flour fabricated from broiled masa (ground broiled blah that has been advised with lime) that is acclimated for tamales.

Malanga: An comestible bake-apple with asperous amber bark and cream-colored flesh. It is developed and acclimated in the tropics of the Americas and is an important aliment in the Caribbean islands and in Venezuela.

Matambre: An Argentinean abut steak formed with herbs, egg and vegetables.

Migas: A acceptable breakfast bowl in Spanish and Portuguese cuisine that combines eggs with extra aliment or tortillas.

Mojito: A Cuban cocktail fabricated with rum, adhesive abstract and beginning mint.

Mojo: A hot booze usually absolute at atomic olive oil, garlic and citrus, additional a admixture of cumin, paprika and added spices.

Mondongo: A archetypal Puerto Rican and Dominican bowl of mashed plantains with garlic and tripe.

Mofongo: A Puerto Rican and Latin American bowl fabricated with mashed plantains and pork cracklings.

Natilla: A candied custard dish.

Nopale: The archetypal Mexican comestible cactus additionally apperceive as annoying pear. Either the accomplished bulb or the blade is used. It?s alleged “nopalitos” back the leaves are chopped into baby pieces.

Pabellón Criollo: A Venezuelan bowl of pulled beef, atramentous beans and rice.

Papas: Potato: Papas fritas are absurd potatoes.

Pastel de Chocio: A meat bouillon covered with a cornmeal crust.

Pernil: A marinated and broiled pork accept bowl that’s accepted in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Picadillo: About begin in Cuba, Mexico and throughout Latin America, this bowl is mainly arena beef alloyed with tomatoes, onions, garlic and added bounded capacity and generally served with white rice or bread. In Mexico, it is sometimes acclimated as a bushing for tacos. It can additionally be able as a stew. The name comes from the Spanish chat “picar,” which agency “to mince” or “chop.”

Plantains (Platanos): A affiliate of the assistant ancestors that is consistently acclimated cooked. The bake-apple has a sweet, banana-like acidity and a brownish-black bark back ripe. It can be served either agreeable or sweet.

Platacones: Plantain chips.

Poblano: Beginning blooming chile that’s abnormally accepted in Mexico and Central America. Back dried, it is alleged the ancho chile.

Pollo Borracho: A archetypal Cuban and Puerto Rican broiled Craven dish. Translated, it agency “drunken chicken.”

Ponche:A celebratory Dominican and Puerto Rican buttery cooler that is agnate to eggnog and generally alloyed with rum.

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Pozole: A affable soup fabricated from hominy and absolute pork.

Pupas: A blubbery blah tortilla generally blimp with cheese.

Queso Fresco Blanco: Salty, firm, white cheese agnate to mozzarella or Muenster. Translated, it agency “fresh white cheese.”

Quinoa: Pronounced “KEEN-wah.” A tiny, age-old atom able by the Incas that is still developed abundantly in the Andean arena of South America. Quinoa is aerial in protein and nutrients and can be acclimated like rice or couscous, admitting it is frequently acclimated in soup.

Recaito: A abject for stews, soups and meats that is fabricated with garlic, cilantro, onion, alkali and spices.

Ropa Vieja: A disconnected beef bowl of Spanish agent fabricated with brim or abut steak in a tomato-based booze and served with rice.

Saffron: The baby orange stigmas from a crocus bulb that are acclimated in paella and added rice dishes, soups and curries, as able-bodied as in some bakery products. Saffron adds to the blush and acidity of a dish.

Salsa Verde: Blooming booze frequently acclimated in Mexican cuisine.

Sancocho: A South American basis vegetable stew.

Sangria: A wine bite about from Spain and Portugal. The chat sangria comes from sangre, acceptation “blood.”

Sazon: A acclimatized alkali admixture acclimated in Latin America and Mexico that generally includes cilantro, achiote and garlic.

Scallion: A milder tasting onion. Both the white cheers and the blooming acme are frequently used. They are alleged “small blooming onions” in Brail and “Chinese onions” in Peru.

Sofrito: Admixture of sautéed vegetables, usually including onion, garlic, alarm peppers, tomatoes, herbs and spices. Sofritos are a arch foundation for abounding stews and meat dishes.

Sopa de Mariscos: A Latin American seafood stew.

Sopes: Absurd Mexican blah chef topped with beans, meats and cheese.

Spanish Olives: Flavorful blooming olives that appear in a array of sizes and generally are blimp with pimento.

Spanish Onions: Spanish onions appear in three colors — yellow, red and white. Craven onions are concentrated and reliable for affable about anything. Red onions are acceptable for assay and beginning uses. With a aureate blush and candied acidity back sautéed, white onions are the acceptable onion acclimated in archetypal Mexican cuisine.

Tamales: Corn-based appetizer or bite that is sometimes served apparent but about contains a agreeable filling. Usually it is captivated in a broiled blah bark and steamed.

Tomatillos: Additionally alleged the “Mexican blooming tomato,” this affiliate of the nightshade ancestors is accompanying to the tomato. The tomatillo’s chiffon bark should be removed afore using.

Tostones: Absurd plantains, burst and served with garlic sauce.

Tortas: Mexican sandwich that can be served hot or cold.

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Vatapá: A Brazilian bowl of bread, shrimp, attic milk and nuts.

Yucca (Yuca): Additionally accepted as manioc or cassava, this white, civil abutting vegetable was originally developed by the aboriginal peoples of Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil.

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Glossary of Latin Cooking Terms

Navigate Latin American markets and menus with confidence and ease.

Related To:

Acarajé: An Afro-Brazilian street food made with black-eyed peas and dried shrimp.

Achiote: Brick-red seeds with a mildly acidic, earthy flavor. They're often used as natural coloring to give a yellowish tint to foods such as butter and cheese.

Adobo: Marinade. Dry adobos are spice rubs for meat, fish or poultry.

Ajiaco: A South American chicken and root vegetable soup.

Aji: Also known as the Peruvian hot pepper, this is a unique species of chile, containing several different breeds. Commonly ground into powders, they come in different colors and have a distinctive, fruity flavor. Aji is also a term for a South American salsa that's served with stews and soups.

Albóndigas: Meatballs.

Arepas: A corn-based bread from the northern Andes in South America.

Arroz con Gandules
: A festive Puerto Rican rice dish made with pigeon peas.

Arroz con Leche: A Latin American sweet rice pudding sometimes made with sweetened condensed milk or coconut milk.

Arroz con Pollo: Translated as "rice with chicken" in Spanish, this traditional dish is common throughout Latin America.

Avocado: Botanically a fruit, the avocado is usually treated as a vegetable. Avocados have been widely used in Latin America since the time of the Aztecs, Mayas and Incas.

Bacalao: Dried salt cod that is popular throughout Latin America.

Bacon: Any certain cut of meat taken from the sides, belly or back of a pig that may be cured and/or smoked.

Batidos: Milkshake or smoothie usually made with fresh fruit.

Bell Peppers: Large, bell-shaped fruits that come in different colors, such as yellow, red, green and orange, and lack the heat of many other varieties of chiles.

Boniato: Tuber also known as white sweet potato, Florida yam and camote. It looks like a sweet potato, but is shorter and rounder with a white, slightly sweet and mealy flesh.

Buñuelos: Doughnut-like fritters flavored with a syrup or honey and often anise and cinnamon.

Caipirinha: Brazilian cocktail made with Cachaca (brandy made from sugarcane), sugar and lime juice.

Calabaza: A large, round, sweet squash. Often called a West Indian pumpkin because it resembles a pumpkin in size and coloring.

Canela: Cinnamon.

Carnitas
: Roasted pork served with corn tortillas and salsa. Translated, it means "little meats."

Cazuela: A hearty meat stew found in Chile and other South American countries.

Ceviche: Raw fish or seafood pickled and "cooked" in the acidic juice of citrus fruit. Ceviches are often flavored with herbs, chiles and other ingredients.

Champurrado: A warm, thick, chocolate-based Mexican drink.

Chicharron: Puffy fried pork rind eaten as a snack.

Chicharron de Pollo: Fried chicken, popular in the Dominican Republic.

Chimichurri: Pesto-like condiment from Argentina that's made with a base of parsley, garlic and olive oil and often used with grilled meat.

Chipotle Pepper: Smoked jalapeno chile. Available canned, in a sauce and dried.

Churros: A Latin American dessert, similar to a donut or cruller.

Chocolate: Processed foods that are produced from the seeds of the cacao tree. Native to lowland, tropical South America, cacao has been cultivated for 3,000 years in Central America and Mexico.

Chorizo: Spicy pork sausage. Mexican chorizo uses fresh pork Spanish chorizo uses smoked pork.

Chupes de Corvina y Camarones: A striped bass and shrimp stew.

Cilantro: Also called coriander, this leafy herb is essential to Latin American cooking, particularly Mexican, Andean and Brazilian.

Cinnamon: Mexican cinnamon. Also known as Ceylon cinnamon for the island where it originated.

Coconut: A fruit that arrived in Bahia, Brazil in 1553 and from there, spread throughout South America. Latin American cuisine uses both its milk and meat.

Cotijo: A Mexican cheese also known as Queso Anejado or "aged cheese." Sold in small rounds or large blocks, this salty, pungent cheese can be moist with a texture like Feta or very firm for grating. Criumbled cheese can be used in tacos, soups, salads or over beans.

Cumin (Comino): This strongly aromatic, distinctive spice is used in the foods of North Africa, Mexico, India and western Asia.

Dulce de Leche: Refers to both a sauce and caramel-like candy.

Empanadas: A stuffed, savory pastry of Spanish origins.

Feijoa: A subtropical fruit native to the grasslands of southern Brazil and part of Paraguay and Uruguay. A close relative of the guava, it has an oval shape, thin green skin and semi-soft, juicy, cream-colored flesh with a sweet, aromatic flavor.

Flan: A custard dessert coated with caramel, similar to crème caramel.

Frijoles: Term for beans, typically used in Mexico.

Guava: Subtropical fruit with green skin and sweet, pink flesh that is popular throughout Latin America.

Jalepeño: A medium-hot to very-hot chile that is popular in Mexican cooking.

Jicama: Also known as the Mexican potato or Mexican turnip, this large crispy root vegetable is good both raw and lightly cooked.

Locro: A hearty, thick stew that always contains corn.

Mango: This fruit has fragrant, juicy, sweet flesh when fully ripe. Native to Asia, it is popular in Latin American cooking.

Maracuyá: Also called passion fruit. A round, lime-sized fruit with bright orange, highly perfumed and bracingly tart flesh.

Masa Harina: Flour made from dried masa (ground dried corn that has been treated with lime) that is used for tamales.

Malanga: An edible tuber with rough brown skin and cream-colored flesh. It is grown and used in the tropics of the Americas and is an important food in the Caribbean islands and in Venezuela.

Matambre: An Argentinean flank steak rolled with herbs, egg and vegetables.

Migas: A traditional breakfast dish in Spanish and Portuguese cuisine that combines eggs with leftover bread or tortillas.

Mojito: A Cuban cocktail made with rum, lime juice and fresh mint.

Mojo: A hot sauce usually containing at least olive oil, garlic and citrus, plus a mixture of cumin, paprika and other spices.

Mondongo: A classic Puerto Rican and Dominican dish of mashed plantains with garlic and tripe.

Mofongo: A Puerto Rican and Latin American dish made with mashed plantains and pork cracklings.

Natilla: A sweet custard dish.

Nopale: The typical Mexican edible cactus also know as prickly pear. Either the whole plant or the leaf is used. It?s called "nopalitos" when the leaves are chopped into small pieces.

Pabellón Criollo: A Venezuelan dish of pulled beef, black beans and rice.

Papas: Potato: Papas fritas are fried potatoes.

Pastel de Chocio: A meat stew covered with a cornmeal crust.

Pernil: A marinated and roasted pork shoulder dish that's popular in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Picadillo: Typically found in Cuba, Mexico and throughout Latin America, this dish is mainly ground beef mixed with tomatoes, onions, garlic and other regional ingredients and often served with white rice or bread. In Mexico, it is sometimes used as a filling for tacos. It can also be prepared as a stew. The name comes from the Spanish word "picar," which means "to mince" or "chop."

Plantains (Platanos): A member of the banana family that is always used cooked. The fruit has a sweet, banana-like flavor and a brownish-black skin when ripe. It can be served either savory or sweet.

Platacones: Plantain chips.

Poblano: Fresh green chile that's especially popular in Mexico and Central America. When dried, it is called the ancho chile.

Pollo Borracho: A classic Cuban and Puerto Rican stewed Chicken dish. Translated, it means "drunken chicken."

Ponche:A celebratory Dominican and Puerto Rican creamy beverage that is similar to eggnog and often mixed with rum.

Pozole: A hearty soup made from hominy and salted pork.

Pupas: A thick corn tortilla often stuffed with cheese.

Queso Fresco Blanco: Salty, firm, white cheese similar to mozzarella or Muenster. Translated, it means "fresh white cheese."

Quinoa: Pronounced "KEEN-wah." A tiny, ancient grain cultivated by the Incas that is still grown extensively in the Andean region of South America. Quinoa is high in protein and nutrients and can be used like rice or couscous, though it is traditionally used in soup.

Recaito: A base for stews, soups and meats that is made with garlic, cilantro, onion, vinegar and spices.

Ropa Vieja: A shredded beef dish of Spanish origin made with skirt or flank steak in a tomato-based sauce and served with rice.

Saffron: The small orange stigmas from a crocus plant that are used in paella and other rice dishes, soups and curries, as well as in some bakery products. Saffron adds to the color and flavor of a dish.

Salsa Verde: Green sauce commonly used in Mexican cuisine.

Sancocho: A South American root vegetable stew.

Sangria: A wine punch typically from Spain and Portugal. The word sangria comes from sangre, meaning "blood."

Sazon: A seasoned salt mixture used in Latin America and Mexico that often includes cilantro, achiote and garlic.

Scallion: A milder tasting onion. Both the white bottoms and the green tops are commonly used. They are called "small green onions" in Brail and "Chinese onions" in Peru.

Sofrito: Mixture of sautéed vegetables, usually including onion, garlic, bell peppers, tomatoes, herbs and spices. Sofritos are a saucy foundation for many stews and meat dishes.

Sopa de Mariscos: A Latin American seafood stew.

Sopes: Fried Mexican corn dough topped with beans, meats and cheese.

Spanish Olives: Flavorful green olives that come in a variety of sizes and often are stuffed with pimento.

Spanish Onions: Spanish onions come in three colors — yellow, red and white. Yellow onions are full-flavored and reliable for cooking almost anything. Red onions are good for grilling and fresh uses. With a golden color and sweet flavor when sautéed, white onions are the traditional onion used in classic Mexican cuisine.

Tamales: Corn-based appetizer or snack that is sometimes served plain but typically contains a savory filling. Usually it is wrapped in a dried corn husk and steamed.

Tomatillos: Also called the "Mexican green tomato," this member of the nightshade family is related to the tomato. The tomatillo's papery husk should be removed before using.

Tostones: Fried plantains, smashed and served with garlic sauce.

Tortas: Mexican sandwich that can be served hot or cold.

Vatapá: A Brazilian dish of bread, shrimp, coconut milk and nuts.

Yucca (Yuca): Also known as manioc or cassava, this white, starchy tropical vegetable was originally grown by the indigenous peoples of Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil.


Ancho chiles stuffed with foie gras (Anchos rellenos con foie gras)

From Doña Tomás Cookbook: Discovering Authentic Mexican Cooking Doña Tomás Cookbook by Thomas Schnetz and Dona Savitsky and Mike Wille

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  • Categories: Appetizers / starters Mexican
  • Ingredients: garlic ground allspice bay leaves apple cider vinegar piloncillo sugar dried ancho chiles foie gras shallots cilantro

By Sue Lau | Palatable Pastime

My recipe of the day is for caldo de camaron, or Mexican shrimp soup, with the Fish Friday Foodies blogging group.

I love the flavors in a Mexican seafood soup so enjoy having it when I can. Perfect timing that Fish Friday is having the monthly recipe posting, and the topic is for International soups.

Cold Weather Warmer

We got snow recently although it likely won’t last. But regardless, it will still be cold for months now. And nothing better to warm us up than a soup imbued with the flavors of pasilla and ancho chili.

Chili Pepper Prep

You can buy both of those in the jar or grind them yourself- generally they get toasted up, torn apart, the seeds removed, and then ground in a mortar or spice grinder.

Alternatively, you can soak them in hot water and then puree to make a paste. It all comes out the same. I generally grind mine with a spice mill so I can have it all ready if I make enchilada sauce or chili or something. Having to stop and prep last minute is a lot like finding you are out of an ingredient and have to run to the store. I hate that.

Forgiving with Tweaks

You can vary the vegetables in this if you like but these are the ones I prefer. Carrots and onion are very common in all soups as part of the mirepoix, but the addition of zucchini or calabacitas as that variety is called, is very apropos.



Comments:

  1. Claegborne

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  2. Elias

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